Chem question posed by a student

Chem question posed by a student

Posted by Ian Galeski on Oct 14, 2014 1:56 pm

Hi all,
 
I got a question the other day about the difference between a chemical reaction and static charge--what's the difference? I couldn't find an answer that satisfied the student so I'm wondering if anyone has suggestions?
 
In a chemical reaction, electrons are shared or stolen between atoms to form new substances. In static charge, positively or negatively charged particles flow between substances so the substances become more negatively charged or more positively charged.
 
But how do I explain that the electron transfer is different in each case?
 
Thanks for your help!

Re: Chem question posed by a student

Posted by Phil Yates on Oct 14, 2014 2:34 pm

Dear Ian,
Given the nature of your question, I think it would be worth re-posting it in the Talk Chemistry group forum.
With best wishes
phil
MyRSC manager

Re: Chem question posed by a student

Posted by Yasmin Hussain on Jun 12, 2020 11:58 am

Hai Ian,

To explain electron transfer, I think you should start with electron valence first. Because electron transfer prone to occurred if the substance has electron valence. In other words, atoms form covalent bonds, to share their valence electrons, so that they achieve a more stable state by filling their valence electron shell. So yeah, I suggest you to refresh on electron valence. 😄
 

Want to reply?

You must be signed in to MyRSC to respond to forum posts. If you're not currently a member, you can register for free.